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Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

The most recent publications appear first.

How does the mathematics environment shape student experience?

2020, Student Experience Research Network

This one-pager draws on research from the Inclusive Mathematics Environments Early Career Fellowship to illustrate how the learning environment can shape student experience in the context of mathematics. It is designed to serve as a starting point for learning about the research that was completed through the fellowship.

The relationship among classroom growth mindset climate, trust and respect, and student performance in mathematics

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot provides an overview of a SERN-funded project led by Stephanie Fryberg and Mary Murphy that explored growth mindset classroom climates, defined as students’ shared perception that the teacher believes that all students can master the class material using hard work, effective learning strategies, and asking for help when needed. The study uses a nationally representative sample of 9th grade students in regular U.S. high schools.

Can a growth mindset program overcome persistent messages about the stability of intelligence?

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot summarizes a project led by Alison Koenka as part of the National Study of Learning Mindsets Early Career Fellowship. The project explores two questions: 1) Do academic labeling and mathematics tracking predict differences in students’ beliefs about intelligence, motivational beliefs, and academic performance? 2) Does a growth mindset program (i.e., an intervention promoting beliefs that intelligence is malleable) differentially influence students’ beliefs and performance based on their academic labeling and mathematics tracking experiences?

Adolescents’ fixed mindset and stereotype concerns in mathematics: Their relations to anxiety, challenge avoidance, and achievement

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot summarizes a project led by Eunjin Seo as part of the National Study of Learning Mindsets Early Career Fellowship. The study investigates the extent to which 9th grade students' self-reported concerns about racial/ethnic and gender stereotypes in mathematics predict mathematics anxiety, challenge avoidance, and achievement, as well as how fixed mindset beliefs play into these relationships.

The formation of learning profiles in context: Mathematics anxiety, achievement, and interest in adolescents

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot summarizes a project led by Michael Broda as part of the National Study of Learning Mindsets Early Career Fellowship. The project uses multilevel latent profile analysis to identify distinct learning profiles based on students' mathematics anxiety, interest, and achievement. The role of teachers' mathmatics anxiety and view of mathematics instruction is also examined.

Relations among students’ motivation, mathematics anxiety, and mathematics achievement

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot summarizes a project led by Nicole Sorhagen as part of the National Study of Learning Mindsets Early Career Fellowship. The project examines if and how mathematics anxiety and achievement are connected, and whether growth mindset plays a role in the relationship.

Estimating the impact of growth mindset on high school mathematics performance and course-taking

2019, Student Experience Research Network

This research snapshot summarizes a project led by Soobin Kim as part of the National Study of Learning Mindsets Early Career Fellowship. The study evaluated casual effects of the growth mindset program used in the National Study of Learning Mindsets, and how those effects differed based on students' incoming mathematics GPA, mathematics course placement, and the fraction of control group students in their school who did not participate in the growth mindset program but nevertheless experienced an increase in self-reported growth mindset.

Gender stereotypes about intellectual ability emerge early and influence children’s interests

2017, Student Experience Research Network

This research brief overviews a study by Andrei Cimpian and his colleagues, exploring the development of stereotypes about intelligence. The research team conducted multiple studies to assess the developmental trajectory of the endorsement of gender stereotypes among young children between the ages of 5 and 7. They found that by the age of 6, girls were less likely than boys to believe that members of their gender are “really, really smart” and were less likely to participate in activities labeled for children that were very smart.